Tag Archives: Trump

A sharp turn to the right!

It seems that the world we live in is getting crazier by the day. Just this week we have seen the atrocious terrorist attacks in Spain, white supremacists marching in America and killing opponents to their despicable beliefs, and, to top it all, at home we have seen the growth of a campaign on behalf of that throwback Jacob Rees-Mogg; there have even been suggestions that he could be the next leader of the conservative party! Not that any of these events are truly surprising, but they do highlight the way things are at present.

The whole idea that America is a “white” country is beyond ludicrous. Europeans were the invaders, driving back the indigenous, non-white, population who they have treated appallingly ever since. The colonialist’s approach to the native population represented the worst of European arrogance, something we have seen time and time again as European nations spread their influence across Asia, Africa and the Americas.

North America in particular, has thrived for centuries on immigration. Don’t forget it is a comparatively new country and a large proportion of the population is probably no more than a couple of generations on from an immigrant. The continuing influence of white supremacists in the southern states just goes to show how out of touch with reality and the modern world these people really are.

America may claim to be the land of the free, but to some that only seems to apply if you are a white Christian. One of Donald Trump’s earliest blunders was his idea to place a ban on travel from selected, mainly Muslim, countries. This came in response to perceived threats from Isis. But coming at a time when the biggest threat to innocent lives is from home-grown, gun toting madmen, it is clear that the President either doesn’t understand the real issue, or, more likely, is choosing to ignore it and, like so many people before him, blunder about placing the blame for the nation’s woes on the most visibly obvious minority.

But once again, neither America or Trump are the first to react in this way, and they won’t be the last. When times are hard, or people face uncertainty, rather than look at themselves, they will look outward and seek an easy target to vent their fury and frustration. After all, it is easy to lay the blame for your troubles on others rather than yourself, particularly those who, for one reason or another, are outwardly conspicuous. If unemployment is high, blame the immigrants for taking our jobs. You can’t get on the housing ladder, blame the immigrants who are taking all our social housing stock. Long queues at the hospital, then it must be all those immigrants coming here for free treatment. To anyone with any sense, all of these statements are obviously untrue, but they are things we all hear said time and time again.

Some people don’t have the patience or the capacity to look beyond the overly simplistic rhetoric of the far-right and take the easy option of accepting a point of view that seems to offer a simple solution. But the simple solution is very rarely the best and, hardly ever, the right answer. Trump’s threat to tighten up immigration controls plays right into the hands of the extremists and legitimises their twisted view of the world. And is hesitation in condemning the neo-Nazi’s behind the killing last week of Heather Heyer just goes to highlight that it is not just the KKK that we need to be rid of.

Of course, we face similar, though much less overtly obvious problems of our own. We also have a leader whose position within their own party has been weakened by their arrogance and poor decision making. While Trump plays his dangerous games in the far East, Theresa May continues to flounder around over the issue that dominates the political arena, Brexit. A lot has already been said about the jingoism expressed during that particular campaign. It was just another example of the growing nationalism that we have seen right across Europe. Whilst we do not have the same issue in this country with neo-Nazis, the popular acceptance of right wing rhetoric as worrying.

Terrorist attacks like those in Manchester, London and Barcelona only add fuel to the nationalistic fire. Whether or not they are achieving their goal is hard to say, but what they can take some credit for is giving the far right, as well as those who seek simple solutions, ammunition to back up their calls for deportations and a clamp down on immigration.

And the last thing we need is the likes of Jacob-Rees-Mogg gaining any more influence than he already has. Mind you, if he ever did get himself elected as leader of the Conservative Party it would polarise political views in this country, particularly as the Labour Party is now led be someone from the left. It would ensure their policies were discernibly different.

 

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asylum

The lunatics have taken over the asylum

I have been quiet for a few weeks now, not because I have nothing to say or that there is nothing to talk about, because there certainly is. Being honest, as I suppose I must be, I have another project that has rather distracted me of late and taken up what little time and energy I have available.

Looking around at the moment you might be forgiven for thinking that you have entered some kind of twilight zone. As the great Neil Peart once wrote: “You have entered the Twilight Zone, beyond this world strange things are known.” Peart (drummer and lyricists with Rush) has always had a wonderful way with words, and in this 1976 song he was portraying a world beyond our own where anything can happen, based on the TV series of the same name. But here we are, 41 years later and those lines seem to sum up the world I find myself in.

And this is a slightly surreal world, though not too dissimilar from the world of 1976 when Rush recorded “Twilight Zone” for their career defining album “2112”. I had thought we had left the threat of nuclear war behind us, but then along comes Kim Jong-un and his counterpart Donald Trump. Two of the wackiest leaders the world has seen for some time. Whilst Korean madman Kim has nuclear weapons at the top of his birthday wish list, the tragedy that is Donald Trump is flexing his fingers, ready to push that proverbial button. And I am quite sure that if he thought he thought it would benefit him in any way, he would have pushed it by now. For once the Russians seem to be staying out of things. They have caused quite enough trouble in Ukraine and Syria without adding any further fuel to the fire.

So, other than the antagonists, no change there.

And what about things closer to home? Well, things aren’t all that rosy here either. I remember the political and economic mayhem of the 1970s only too well. The economy was going down the pan, labour relations were at an all-time low, unemployment was on the rise and the divide between the rich and poor was as deep as ever. After the struggles on the Margaret Thatcher era it seemed that all of this was behind us, but now I am not so sure.

Over the past few months we have seen acid attacks, terrorists striking our city centres and deaths due to negligence and penny pinching. We have a lame duck government that is struggling to put together anything remotely like a coherent plan for the future. Policy and direction seem to change with the wind, and with the current effects of climate change, that is a lot more frequent than it used to be. And with public sector pay being frozen and jobs slashed, things don’t seem to have moved too far from those troubled and insecure days that gave rise to punk rock and Margaret Thatcher.

Today the BBC published the salaries of its top stars. And linked to the recent pay increases for big bosses and politicians, it just rubs salt into the wounds of our health workers, police, teachers and other public-sector workers who have had to deal with real-term pay cuts for several years now. For someone like Theresa May, who along with her husband has great personal wealth, to condemn those at the lower end of the pay scale is hypocrisy on an almost bewildering scale.

Actually, much of what I see around me at the moment is somewhat bewildering. I have never been able to get my head around the thinking behind the actions of terrorists who target the innocent, or politicians who put personal gain above the needs of the public they are supposed to serve. Unfortunately that is the way of the world we live in.

Lies, madness and terrorism

As I start to reflect on the week that has passed, I can’t help feeling more despair than optimism. Not only was this the week that Donald Trump outdid himself by withdrawing the USA from the Paris agreement, Saturday night brought yet another senseless terrorist attack in London. All of this on the back of even more lies and personal attacks that have become the hallmark of the current General Election campaign.

I must admit that as far as the election is concerned, I have become increasingly impressed by Jeremy Corbyn. Despite everything he has faced since becoming the Labour leader, he remains calm and collected and true to his values. It is obvious he has also learned the need to compromise and the importance of gaining trust and a consensus. Yes, there are till those in the Labour Party who do not agree with him, and many I suspect who oppose him, but to me his leadership style is refreshingly open and honest. Whether or not he would make a good Prime Minister I couldn’t say, but his style and policies may just be what we need to bring us back from the brink. After all, the alternative is Theresa May who has proved herself to be uncaring, shifty and blinkered to the needs of the country.

Throughout the campaign so far, Theresa May and her team have been continually put onto the back foot, struggling to defend policies aimed at dismantling the welfare system and removing almost all protection the less affluent and those less able to defend themselves. The “Dementia Tax” debacle was probably one of the most damaging policy changes of any outgoing government. And to claim they have not been forced to make a U-turn on the proposal is nothing more than lies.

But lies are at the heart of this campaign. Personal attacks on Corbyn and blatant lies about Labour’s policies have formed the thrust of the Tory election campaign. It is easier to twist the words of your opponents to make out they are saying something they are not than to come up with anything original of your own.

And the constant harping on about a strong Brexit is just a smoke screen. When negotiating Britain’s departure from the EU, what we want is a team prepared to negotiate and if necessary make some compromises to get the best deal we can. Anyone who believes that by shouting, throwing tantrums and making unrealistic demands we can get the best deal for the UK is living in cloud cuckoo land! As we negotiate to leave the European club, the remaining members have no interest in making it easy, and everything to gain from making the divorce painful and costly. If we were on the other side with, say, France wanting out, who are we kidding if we think our government would try to make it easy? On the contrary, we would be doing everything we could to ensure that they retain none of the rights of membership without paying a hefty price. So, who can blame the French, Germans and the rest of the community doing the same.

May’s autocratic approach is very similar to Donald Trump’s, but without the added paranoia. This week saw Mr Trump follow through on another of his election pledges, to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement on tackling climate change. He has consistently maintained that he believes the climate change issue to be a fake, a hoax conjured up by the Chines. He sees it as an attack on the American economy. It’s as if he honestly believes that the rest of the word have conspired against them, as if the whole agreement is targeted at damaging American businesses and interests. But what is most frightening is just how many people in the US agree with him!

Having said that, I suppose we shouldn’t really be surprised. Whilst America has for several generations been at the heart of technological and social change, it is also one of the most conservative nations in the world one of the last to abandon slavery and recognise equal rights. It is also the country where they still ban the teaching of evolution, because it goes against the teachings of the bible!

But bad as all of this is, Saturday night’s terror attack in London reminds us that we face more problems than the strictly political. Another seven innocent deaths at the hands of extremist cowards reminds us of the fragile state of the world as a whole. The UK is far from unique in having to face an increase in acts of terror. This weeks has also seen the bombing of a funeral in Kabul and the massacre of innocent men, women and children in Mosul. The need for a strong and united front to face these growing threats to our freedom and liberty has never been more apparent, but selfish and arrogant leadership of the likes of Donald Trump actually make it more difficult.

Knee jerk reactions and calls for radical action against immigrants make good headlines, but are poor policies. Whilst we must do all we can to prevent such atrocities happening again in our streets, we must not resort to the kind of draconian measures and illiberal policies that many seem to be advocating. It is easy to point the figure and find a scapegoat for the ills of the world.

But there signs of hope with the election of Emmanuel Macron as French President and Leo Varadkar as the new leader of Ireland’s  Fine Gael party. Both elections fly in the face of the more extreme and conservative views being expressed in some quarters. I for one would hope that when it comes to deciding this country’s future at the polls this week, we don’t turn our back on the opportunity to turn away from the current right-wing path and instead take the more socially responsible and considered approach being put forward by Jeremy Corbyn. In an ideal world, I would prefer to see a LibDem government or coalition but I am not naive enough to consider this to be a possibility in the current climate. But never say never…